It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet!

Where Has It Gone?

I know, it’s a tired joke, but I suspect we’ve all seen recent cases of people buying into things that make us think that’s what they believe. That anybody can have a website and say whatever they want is the blessing of the Internet… and the curse.

It happens in virtually every niche, but since my niche is SEO, I’ll focus on that. And I can even speak from personal experience, because there was a time I was guilty of a variation of this myself.

A Common Mistake?

I set out to educate myself on SEO about nine years ago. I decided to build a website for the company I was consulting for, and they had nobody with any IT experience, and had a desperate need of an online presence. I built the site (it was an embarrassingly crappy job), but they weren’t willing to spend more than $50 per week on AdWords.

Don’t laugh! Getting them to spend even that was like pulling teeth.

While researching ways to make the program more effective, I came across this “SEO” thing that was totally new to me, that sounded like an interesting way to get millions of dollars into the company coffer.

Being an engineer, I naturally planned my studies of this sure-fire way to swamp the production floor with new work. I started spending 2-3 hours every day, reading the blogs of all the most prominent SEO folks I could find.

I also joined three or four forums that had sections devoted to SEO, search and internet marketing, and racked up thousands of posts, and probably read tens of thousands.

And of course, the end result was that I was totally confused, because it seemed that nearly anything that was said was followed by something else that contradicted it.

Finding the Gold

Some of what I found, of course, was great information… pearls of SEO wisdom to add to my collection. But there was also a lot of crap, the sort of wacky ideas that could cause real problems. The problem was that it was sometimes difficult to figure out which was which.

And in my opinion, my friends, that is the biggest problem today that faces the folks that want to learn what’s right or wrong, safe or risky, effective or a waste of time, for their sites.

Too much noise!

(Photo: Rogiro via Flickr/Creative Commons)

Too much noise, not enough music!

So what’s the solution? While a person is still learning, how can he/she tell if some SEO “celebrity” is talking through his hat? There may be other ways to go about it, but I’ll tell you what worked for me.

While I was hanging out in forums and commenting on popular blogs, plus a little interacting on Facebook and Twitter, I got to “know” a few people. I tried to ask intelligent questions (I had plenty of stupid questions at hand too… but I kept them to myself, for the most part), and refrained from stating any opinions that I couldn’t back up.

In short, I kept my mouth shut unless I had something worthwhile to say. And I listened. To everyone.

And believed nobody. At least until either they proved their position or they were supported by others in whom I had already begun to trust.

That helped me start to sort the wheat from the chaff, but it still wasn’t enough. I needed to understand before I could really believe, and forums and blogs usually didn’t fill that need. People often aren’t willing to share publicly, as much as they might in a more private setting.

Then, a friend pointed me to a different kind of community: the SEO Training Dojo. By the end of my first month, I was hooked. At first, most of the discussions were over my head. but the members in the Dojo’s chatroom shared a lot of information and didn’t hold much back when discussing the more technical aspects of SEO, the reasons behind certain practices and the risks/rewards of others.

Outdated Flat Wrong

After a few months, I had learned enough to be able to contribute a little to the discussions. As I sat in on some of those deeper discussions, I began to realize that even some of the “name” blogs I’d been reading for a couple of years were either outdated or just flat wrong.

I started trying the things we discussed myself, and in the process, learned a lot more. In fact, hardly a day went by that I didn’t learn something in that chatroom.

I was fortunate, in that I’d been guided to a community where the majority of the members knew what they were talking about and were perfectly willing to admit when they weren’t sure about something. Egos were left at the door.

Not to mention that they were more than willing to share with someone that was willing to learn. And boy! Was I willing to learn!

Find YOUR Community

You may have a different style from mine, or be comfortable in a different sort of group, but I suggest you find one like I did, where the egos wait outside, while folks are happily sharing inside. It’s the fastest way I can imagine to learn what’s what, without any stupid personality games to muddy the water.

The larger the community, the more likely it is that you’ll encounter less sincerity and more polarization. All of them may have value present, but in some, it’s harder to sort it out. The same is true of forums, as well. And if you’re very fortunate, you’ll not only learn a lot, you’ll also build some great relationships.

About Sheldon Campbell

Doc Sheldon is co-founder of Top Shelf Copy – a content strategy and SEO services firm with offices in San Diego, California, and Albany, New York – where he specializes in technical SEO and Content Strategy. Doc has over 30 years experience in marketing and professional journalism bolstering his 9 years online marketing background. In addition to his primary interest – the Semantic Web and the technologies to achieve that end – Doc also performs organic search optimization services for Top Shelf’s clients worldwide, specializing in content strategy services.

Comments

  1. What you are writing about is not only true for the internet, but for the whole life. In an interview with German newsmagazine “Die Welt” in 2001-10-30 I advised my fellow students to attentively listen to their professors but not to belief anything until it has proven right. The magazine didn’t publish this part of the interview – there was a lot of fake around it, too. So don’t even believe in trusted newspapers and newsmagazines.

  2. Great post Doc Sheldon
    I think you have made your point pretty well the larger the community, the more likely it is that you’ll encounter less sincerity and more polarization..
    Thanks..

  3. Hi Mr. Sheldon,
    Thanks for your encouragement and sharing your experience with us. I am new in this blogging world and really it seems that, there are lots of confusions all around us and it is very difficult to judge what is wrong and what is authentic. Hope so, may I find my path.
    Thanks again for your few lines..
    “If you’re very fortunate, you’ll not only learn a lot, you’ll also build some great relationships.”

  4. Thanks for dropping in, Ranjan. Yes, it’s sometimes difficult to sort out the good from the bad, but the biggest part of the battle is just knowing that you need to take everything with a grain of salt, until you’ve thought it out for yourself – or better yet, tested it yourself. Some critical thinking is essential. Don’t try to learn WHAT to think… just learn HOW to think. ;)

  5. Hi, Krunal-

    I used to think that the larger communities offered more information, so it was just a matter of figuring out which bits to keep and which to toss aside. But then I realized that the larger ones carried a lot of baggage – political BS, polarization, self aggrandizement and of course, the ubiquitous spammers… now I concentrate on the communities as an avenue to create new individual relationships, rather than as a classroom… much more productive.
    Thanks for commenting!

  6. “What you are writing about is not only true for the internet, but for the whole life.”
    Agreed, Andreas. I’ve often said the same when colleagues bemoan the large amount of misguided SEO advice… it’s the same in virtually any industry.

    I had a professor many years ago that told us the same thing… “Don’t believe anybody, including me, until you’ve validated it.” The first time he said that, I knew he was going to be one of my best teachers. I wasn’t disappointed.

    Thanks for the comment, Andreas!

  7. Thanks for the link to SEO Dojo – I am in the same niche and will check it out.

    You’re right that we have to find the right places and people to learn from. Separating wheat from chaff is *especially* hard in our industry. Especially since the people in it are somewhat decent at spinning a tale about how great they are. lol

  8. Hi, Matt-

    Yeah, it is hard, although I sometimes wonder if it’s really all that different in SEO than it is in medicine, construction or engineering… I think every field experiences it to a degree. I suppose since our field is highly theoretical, it’s a bigger problem. At least those others have set rules and formulas to work with.

    Thanks for dropping in and commenting. Hope to see you in the Dojo sometime.

  9. This would be a great article – if it actually taught me anything about SEO

Trackbacks

  1. Joe Prasad says:

    It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/XluJpBjw via @SEOcopy

  2. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/XluJpBjw via @SEOcopy

  3. Angela says:

    It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/XluJpBjw via @SEOcopy

  4. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/uYm1iuhy via @level343

  5. Todd Mintz says:

    It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/3S1yGutl via @level343

  6. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/3S1yGutl via @level343

  7. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/3S1yGutl via @level343

  8. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/3S1yGutl via @level343

  9. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/AEMbWogh via @level343

  10. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/AEMbWogh via @level343

  11. Jeff Jacobs says:

    It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/iBcnxpZL via @SEOcopy

  12. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/zEzh9kyB

  13. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/2SP2jhB2 via @level343

  14. Carla Young says:

    It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/LW40mgEn via @SEOcopy

  15. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/ApdLd5mq via @SEOcopy

  16. Dyske Beelen says:

    Gezond verstand… "@hensel: It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/dKV0UGfr via @SEOcopy"

  17. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/ApdLd5mq via @SEOcopy

  18. Steve Hughes says:

    It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/DuKMsWxm via @level343

  19. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/WGIPB8YB via @level343

  20. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! via @DocSheldon at @level343 http://t.co/UP0COcn1

  21. Eren Mckay says:

    It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/fPO6RXz9 via @level343

  22. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/6cCq6kvV via @level343

  23. Judith Lewis says:

    It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/6cCq6kvV via @level343

  24. Ross Dunn says:

    It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/GJcNsLng via…

  25. It MUST be true! I saw it on the Internet! http://t.co/GJcNsLng via…

Speak Your Mind

*