Why Do Professional SEOs Push Google Analytics?

Heaven`s Gate (John)

Heaven`s Gate (John)

Before we get into our SEO services with a client, one of the first things we say is “Do you have analytics installed on your site?” We aren’t the only ones; in fact, some form of analytics is preferable for thousands of professional SEOs. Why? What’s with Google Analytics and other analytics programs? What can we learn?

[Editors Note: Due to the amount of time people have spent complaining that we said "Google Analytics" rather than "analytics program", we made a few changes to the above paragraph to clarify. We hope that more people will now be able to look past the title of the analytics program and more to the point of the article: that some form of analytics is needed.]

Now, search engine optimization is a specialized service. It’s a constantly changing industry, and we have to keep up. This means we can’t spend the time we’d like to become analytic specialists, because we’re busy spending time staying qualified, professional SEOs. We know enough to help our clients, but even we occasionally have to go to someone who knows analytics inside and out. Our analytics specialist is Massimo Paolini, of MPThree Consulting (shameless plug, but he’s worth it!).

Why? Because Google Analytics provides hard data. This isn’t just guess work, readers; hard data, and the ability to understand it inside and out, is essential for the growth of your website and your business.

What Google Analytics Teaches You

Google Analytics gives you or your SEO team a wealth of information on your website, such as:

• How many visitors are reaching the website?
• What page are they landing on? Every page of your website is a landing page; every page can bring visitors.
• Where are they coming from? Visitors can come from a variety of places.
• What search terms did they use to get to the website?
• Are they looking around the site or just leaving from the page they landed on?
• If they visit other pages, which pages do they visit?

Why is this information important?

Landing page: Every page is a landing page, but some pages are not written to be landing pages. In other words, your FAQ, for example, may not have the right copy to keep visitors interested. They may see the FAQ and leave without going deeper into your site. If you find that more visitors are reaching your FAQ instead of your home page (which should be your top landing page), your pages may not be set up correctly in terms of SEO and ranking.

Where they’re coming from: In Google Analytics, you have three sources of traffic: direct (they type in your website url), referrals (from links outside of your site) and search engines (based on keywords).

• Referrals - If you’re using social media to gain visitors, you want to know your efforts are paying off. The same can be said for article marketing, guest blog posting and link building. You may find out that article directory XYZ brings more traffic than article directory ABC; you then know to focus more effort on XYZ.

• Direct – The number of visitors that come to your site from typing your website url is a great indication of visitor loyalty and word of mouth. Comparing the number of direct visitors with visitor trending and loyalty can help give you an idea of how interesting and timely your website is to visitors.

• Search engines – The reports gained from looking at search engine traffic can be invaluable in terms of focusing your SEO efforts. For instance, you may find that, while your website sells candles, you’re getting visitors for candle wicks and sticks because those visitors want to make their own. If you’re getting visits from search terms you have no business being listed on, you know your SEO needs to be adjusted.

Looking or leaving?: Google Analytics doesn’t just show how visitors got there; it also shows what they do once they get there. There’s a little understood term, in fact, that describes just the thing. It’s called “bounce rate”. Bounce rate simply means the percentage of people who visit a page and then visit other on-site pages, vs. those that just visit the page and then leave the site. A high bounce rate (over 40%) means there’s something visitors are expecting that they aren’t getting. If you’re wondering why you have 10,000 visitors a month and no conversions, you’ll probably have a high bounce rate.

Visited pages: Knowing what pages a visitor went to shows you how those visitors see your site. When you put your website up, you might have imagined everyone coming in on your home page, clicking to your services or products and then ordering. One, two, three, money, done. With analytics, what you may find is that, while some visitors follow your imagined steps, others may come in on your services or products page, click to the About Us, visit the Home and then go away.

So why Google Analytics? Why hard data? You can do what many website owners have done since the invention of the Internet, and tweak, twist, rewrite, edit, delete, move around pages, trying to get the “magic formula” for ultimate conversions. OR – you can look at Google Analytics and see the hard data. Then, when you rewrite, edit, delete or move pages, you’re not just guessing. You have a plan, and you’re implementing it.

About Jahnelle Pittman

All around SEO coding geek; AKA "Editing Bulldog" A true geek with a heart of code and SEO, I'm the Senior Project Manager of Level343 and Head of the SEO Department. They call me the "Editing Bulldog" - I'm pretty sure I'm the editing nightmare of writers everywhere, waving a pen across every document in the search for perfect client deliverables. When not buried in paperwork, I'm happily buried in website code, SEO research or playing with my kids.

Comments

  1. Excellent post and the gathered lots of information regarding the Google Analytics.I think that the Google Analytics plays the key role in the SEO and gathered the information regarding the Landing Page etc…..

  2. Hey Ricardo, glad to hear someone else is a big fan… :) I will have to check out Visistat sounds promising.

  3. I love Google Analytics but I’m also a big fan of Visistat (premium solution) and the analytics that they offer.

  4. Thanks for the comment, neo, however rough it may be. I’d like to point out a few things and then leave it to the public to debate:

    We’ve had a few comments from others about Google Analytics, which is fine. You either like it or you don’t. However, the point of the article is not using Google Analytics, but to use some form of analytics, period. The point is, use website statistics programs to find a baseline metric, find out how people are getting there, etc, rather than just guessing. Why did I choose to use “Google Analytics” specifically for this article? Because it’s one of the most popular statistics programs out there; because a lot of people use it; because it has over 3 billion searches per month. As for “taking all your high converting phrases and delivering them up to your competitors”, do you honestly think no one else can come up with those phrases? Do you honestly think that a phrase – any phrase – is unique to a single website? It’s possible, but is it probable? Not in my estimation. It’s not the phrase, it’s what you do with it.

    Lastly, I looked over your link, lovely idea that it is. However, I also looked over the Web for more information (I do a lot of research, you know, I’m good at it). I have to tell you, in case you don’t know… the general consensus is that, while Clicky’s paid services offer more than Google Analytics, the free services don’t compare.

    So what does Google have going for it? Is it the end-all-be-all of analytics programs? No, but it does provide enough information for do-it-yourself webmasters to get an idea of what’s happening on their site. It does help narrow down all the endless possible answers to the question “Why aren’t I getting traffic?” Lastly, and I’m betting this is important to a lot of do-it-yourself SEO webmasters, it’s free.

    If you don’t want to use Google Analytics, wonderful. If you’d rather use a different tracking program, excellent. However, if you have nothing on your site to track statistics, you’re spitting in the wind whenever you change something on your site to get more traffic. As well, if you don’t have a tracking program, Google Analytics is a good place to start.

    If you want to argue whether Google is a good tool to use, I’m not interested. Everybody has an opinion. However, if you want to argue whether having ANY analytics program on your website is worth it, I’ll give you tit for tat. :)

    Thanks again for commenting.

  5. Why would you write this stuff?? Your lack of knowledge is clearly evident.

    Google Analytics is the worst of the tools because of what it doesn’t tell you. The MOST important information of all… *Real time stats* on the *name* of the visitor coming to your website. Everything GA supplies to its users is available on every single other tool out there. The only difference is you aren’t putting a piece of spyware on all your pages that is taking all your high converting phrases and delivering them up to your competitors through Google’s Free Keyword Suggestion tool. If I ever hired an SEO and he suggested I put this on my website, I’d fire him on the spot. It’s like burning in an open fire the cash you’re paying the SEO to give your website a competitive advantage.

    Man Oh Man, stop drinking the Google Koolaid and wake up dude!
    See chart on this page to make a better choice!!!
    http://www.getclicky.com/

  6. Dean Graziosis Scam review says:

    This is such a great post about Google Analytics and from this post I have learned so much about it.I really like that you have provided such valuable information to us as this will be more useful for me.

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  9. One of our readers asked…Does google analytics give your real time information? We responded http://ht.ly/3u6XI -

  10. [...] I understand analytics when I see them? In general, yes – and I’m learning more every day. However, when I want [...]

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